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NEWSLINE 


Wednesday, April 23, 2014 8:36:23 am

Newsline for Apr 23 2014

Good morning to you.

Happy birthday today to Janie Putnam and Lucas Emerson.

 

SYMPATHY

We express sympathy to Lisa Ciabota, (former Parkway member) in the death of her father, Ralph Johnson, Arab, Alabama.  Visitation is today 12 noon, Heritage Funeral Home in Arab, with the funeral following at 2:00 p.m.

 

Super Seniors

Today, April 23.  No lunch.

 

Saturday For The Savior

April 26, 9:45 a.m.—12 noon.

 

SURPRISE PARTY

The congregation is invited to a come-and-go !SURPRISE! birthday party honoring Aleta Davidson’s 90thbirthday, Saturday,  April 26, 1:00 – 2:15 p.m., Chase Park Dining Room.  NO GIFTS.  The family wants at least 90 envelopes filled with cards and memories to celebrate 90 years.  See Rick or Randy Davidson orKylie Ivey for more details.

 

BRIDAL SHOWER

The congregation is invited to a Come-and-Go  Bridal Shower Sunday, April 27, 1:30—3:30 p.m. honoring Brooke Smith and Mason Cothren.  They are registered at Bed, Bath & Beyond, Target, and Belk.

 

LADIES NIGHT OUT

Monday, April 28, 6:00 p.m., Chase Park Dining Room.  Hostess is Pat Lamica.  Menu: Sandwiches and salads.  Theme:  Ladybug, Ladybug.  Sign-up sheet in foyer.

 

HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR RECEPTION

Sunday p.m., May 4.   Please bring nonsweet finger foods.

Graduating seniors are:

 

 Rebecca Brothers

Madison Academy

 

Zach Partlow

Sparkman High

 

Haileigh Stiegler

Huntsville, High

 

PANTRY ITEM

Canned soups

 

I have printed this article before written by Paul Harvey, but I am printing again.

BUT REMEMBER YOU DON’T HAVE TO READ IT!

 

What are farmers made of?

A farmer is a man who wears out two pairs of overalls growing enough cotton for one.

A farmer starts every year with nothing, loses everything he grows and at the end of the year comes out even.

Nobody knows how he does it.  He doesn’t even know himself.

What are farmers made of?

Farmers are made of bent nails, rusty horse shoes and barbed wire and held together with calluses.

Planting time and harvest season, he finishes his 40-hour week by Tuesday noon- then painin’ from tractor back puts in another 72.

He grows corn and melons mostly to make fat crows.

He loads his planter with $1,500 worth of seed, fertilizer, herbicide and insecticide.  That’s one hour’s worth.

In the normal farm afternoon, 1:00 to 10 p.m., he’ll bury $13,500 in the ground in half a day.

Odds are, it’ll get too wet or too dry – or there’ll be hail, wind, early frost, early snow, bugs, brickbats and bureaucrats.

And if he gets a good crop, he won’t meet expenses.

Yet, the only lines on a farmer’s face are from grinning.’

You look at his unattended chores, unpainted buildings, unsharpened tools and untidy barn lot, and you say, “The smartest man in the world would starve trying to do all that!”

And you’re right.  The smartest man would starve.

But not the farmer.  His wife won’t let him.  She has a basic menu; she serves what she has.  In good years, that may be six vegetables at one meal.  In lean years, she jumps from poke salad to black-eyed peas.

He’s got a $40,000 machine needing repair.  It’s 5:30 p.m., and the company-owned stores are closed.  And he’s got five hours of daylight he can’t let go to waste.  So he borrows a machine from a neighbor, is movin’ it down the highway when he’s run into a ditch by some joker pulling a boat.

Yet he remains the world’s most stubborn optimist.  He believes that the fact he’s come this far proves he can go the rest of the way.

He buries last year’s disappointments with springtime plowin’ because his faith is not in himself alone.

He’ll finish a hard week’s work with a five-mile drive to church.

And so he plants in hope, cultivates in faith and ends in debt – then starts over with greater hope and stronger faith.

Heaven help the family that depends on a farmer for support.

Heaven help the nation that doesn’t have him to support it.

 

I can identify with some of this.  A farmer has to love what he is doing.  If you have a farm, your work is never finished.  You repair the fence and it is ready to repair again in a few weeks/months; you bush hog and when you finish, it is ready to start over again at the beginning. 

I reckon we have this thing for gates – we now have 6 farm gates around our house yard area.  But that’s okay, we have a farm yard.  As one of our sons used to say, he loved working on the farm, it made him feel closer to God.

I hope you have a good day.

Tiny


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